Is It Viable To Keep Teleworking? Companies Say No

Is It Viable To Keep Teleworking? Companies Say No

Working from home has been a constant over the past few years. Zoom video calls and working in pyjamas have gone from being odd situations to becoming a real routine. But they could soon be a rarity again. Thousands of companies around the world are betting on a return to the face-to-face model.

Working from home has been a constant over the past few years. Zoom video calls and working in pyjamas have gone from being odd situations to becoming a real routine. But they could soon be a rarity again. Thousands of companies around the world are betting on a return to the face-to-face model.

Working from home has been a constant over the past few years. Zoom video calls and working in pyjamas have gone from being odd situations to becoming a real routine. But they could soon be a rarity again. Thousands of companies around the world are betting on a return to the face-to-face model.

But is this a good thing? Are we really more productive from the office? We explain the teleworking trend in different countries. And we review different models that allow us to combine the best of both worlds.

Is teleworking beneficial?

Office work is gaining ground again. And studies confirm that remote work has many benefits. For companies, office rental costs go down and absenteeism is reduced. For workers, it is easier to save time and money on commuting and increase work-life balance.

But what about productivity? Well, several studies claim that teleworking increases productivity. Employees explain that, as they feel less stressed, they can concentrate better on their tasks. Working from home could be 70% more productive than working in the office.

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, it seemed that the shift to telecommuting would be a radical departure from the traditional work model. Communications were easy and working from home was fast and seamless.

The decline of telework in different countries

And yet, it seems that telework is doomed to disappear soon. Or, at least, to be very much relegated. Face-to-face is becoming increasingly relevant as the COVID-19 pandemic ceases to be a major immediate threat.

Will we all end up going back to the office? We are going to travel to three countries to find out what is the situation of telework in them. Are you coming?

  • Spain. Large Spanish companies are opting for a return to the office. It is true that teleworking is still maintained in many companies, but it is mostly on a partial basis, with two days a week working from home. With the improvement of the health situation, companies are forced to fit teleworking into a framework of greater normality. And most choose to minimize it. This leads, in most cases, to a hybrid model, more or less flexible, in response to employees’ demands for work-life balance.
  • The USA. In the United States, teleworking is also declining sharply. In the first months of 2022, the percentage of home-based workers fell to 10%. However, this recovery of office-based activity is being met with resistance. Many workers do not want to give up telecommuting because they claim it improves their mental health and productivity. Some U.S. companies are committed to the change and give their workers complete freedom to decide whether they want to work from home or in the office.
  • Germany. In the European country, a survey of 9,000 companies showed that almost 25% of workers continue to work from home, at least partially. In Germany, the adaptation to teleworking has been much more profound. Flexible working hours are now a reality. Jobs with telecommuting options reach 35% of employees in the service sector.

Is it possible to maintain teleworking? Models to evaluate

Finding a balance may seem complex. That is why we are going to review the different models of presence and teleworking that exist. Which one is the most convincing for you?

 

  • Absolute presence. The all-week office model seems obsolete. There are exceptions in those positions where presence is indispensable, such as customer service. But the pressure of the workers pushes to models where the conciliation is easier.
  • Full telecommuting. This is not the favourite option of either employees or employers. Telecommuting was a great lifesaver during the long months of the pandemic, but in the long run, it ends up creating disconnection with the company and a sense of loneliness in the employee.
  • Hybrid model. Whether for one or several days a week or for a percentage of the working day, the hybrid model is the most widespread. Most companies opt for this form of work, which allows a better work-life balance without the risks of full teleworking.
  • Freedom of choice. Leaving the decision on the shoulders of the worker seems a difficult utopia to achieve. That each employee decides day by day if they want to go to the office or stay at home may sound very good. But problems arise when it comes to clearly organising office hours or office space. It is not the preferred model for companies, at least for the time being.

Several surveys show that the preferred model for employees is the hybrid model. More than 70% of employees prefer to work from home at least two days a week. Flexible work-at-home options may become an important employee retention tool in the future. So it’s important to highlight them.

Will we work from home or in the office? Whatever happens, you want to have the best people by your side. So trust Jobstoday.world to find your next job anywhere in the world – discover thousands of openings for you now!

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